The Sheepdog Whistle. Tune-in With Our Training Tutorials!

How to teach your herding dog to work on whistle commands

Watch the "Sheepdog Whistle" tutorials to get your dog moving

There are some common misconceptions about whistles and sheepdogs. The first, and very common, is that you must have a shepherd's whistle to train and work a sheepdog - you don't. If you have only a few sheep, and a relatively small area in which to keep and work them, you might never need to use a whistle at all.

Cover image of our sheepdog whistle tutorial, showing a typical whistle, and the title

Dogs' hearing is far better than ours, and although your dog might appear not to hear you on occasions (mentioning no names - KAY) unless you're working over 150 metres away, or shouting into a strong wind, the chances are that your dog's perfectly aware of your commands.

An important part of basic training is to use a soft voice to tell the dog you're pleased when it's working well, and a sharper voice to let the dog know you're not pleased when it's working badly. It's extremely difficult to express how you feel, by blowing a whistle!

Secondly, less common but still surprisingly frequent, is the belief that, in some spooky way, a collie is "wired" to understand and obey a whistle without any training. I can only imagine that this was born out of watching "One Man and His Dog" on TV. Of course the huge majority of sheepdog triallers, even at Nursery level, use a whistle, but the whistle commands have to be taught just as do any other commands in any other discipline.

Thirdly, that it's a challenge to blow a sheepdog whistle, but it's not challenging, exactly, any more than playing the trumpet is challenging. Blowing a sheepdog whistle simply involves learning a technique and then practising - far away from your dogs and your loved ones.

The final, fourth, misconception is that teaching whistle commands to your dog is difficult, but there's no reason why teaching whistle commands should be any more difficult than teaching voice commands.

Andy prepares to work sheepdog Bronwen on whistle commands

For anyone who's contemplating using a sheepdog whistle, and doesn't know where to start, or who's hoping to train whistle commands to their dog, we have two tutorials in the Online Training Tutorials library that will be a huge help. In "The Sheepdog Whistle" Andy demonstrates a tried and tested technique to get you blowing your whistle in minutes.

Once you can make a sound, any sound, you'll find you quickly improve and can begin to invent your own whistle commands (or copy someone else's, of course). This tutorial's had lots of positive feedback from people who've finally discovered the key to their whistle - sometimes after years of trying and failing.

"Teach Your Dog Whistle Commands" shows you that it'll be harder to learn to blow your whistle than to teach the commands to your dog. Andy explains two methods of teaching the commands so you can pick whichever seems more natural to you. "Teach Your Dog Whistle Commands" has been greatly revised since it first appeared in the online tutorials library. It now includes a training session where Andy teaches Bronwen to work on whistle commands.

  • ONLINE SHEEP AND CATTLE DOG TRAINING TUTORIALS
    Clear, inexpensive, herding sheepdog training instruction

    We now have 64 clearly explained, easy to follow sheep and cattle dog training videos for first time sheepdog trainers, farmers, and shepherds. Watch the preview here!

    Click icon at bottom-right of viewer for full-screen mode.

    For a very small monthly (or annual) subscription, watch many hours of expertly presented sheepdog training lessons. Not just theory - we show you what should happen, and what to do when things go wrong. Signup now You may cancel payments at any time and continue to watch for the period paid for.

Sometimes I Really Miss Carew!

Sheepdog Carew standing on a tree stump - looking wonderful!

Since Carew left here, Kay's hearing has deteriorated badly, and occasionally we're stuck for a skilled dog

It's hard to believe that it's nearly two years since Carew left here and to be honest, there have been a few occasions when I've wished she was still here. One such occasion was only a week or so ago.

Our landlord John needed to move some very lively sheep from a field where one of the boundaries was a steep-sided brook with a dense wood on the other side. John warned me that the sheep were likely to "take fright" and disappear into the depths of the wood when they saw the dog, so I was keen to make sure they didn't.

sheepdog bringing about fifteen sheep towards the camera
Quietly in control as always! Carew brings a small bunch of sheep

Since Carew left here, my natural first choice for any difficult work like this has been Kay, but Kay's hearing has deteriorated so much recently that she works purely on instinct. I can only give her commands when she's very close. I've had limited success with hand signals, but of course, they depend on the dog looking towards you, and when Kay's concentrating hard, she's not looking at me, she's looking at the sheep!

Once Kay's more than thirty metres away from me, I can shout for all I'm worth but she can't hear me, so for this tricky work, I decided to take the young Odo with me instead. Poor Odo has been 'sold' twice, but he was returned to us on both occasions. The first time was when his owner couldn't get him to jump into the car (can you believe it?). We actually used Odo to make a training tutorial about it, to show others what to do if they get the same problem. The second time he came back to us was (I think) because the farmer's other dogs didn't like him. Either way, I was happy to buy Odo back. We're very fond of him, and he has great potential, but he lacks experience of "proper" farm work.

Sheepdog Kay awaits her next command
Kay would have been my first choice but I no longer have any control over her when she's more than a few yards away

We've got other dog's coming along nicely of course. Another of Kay's daughters, Maddie, shows great promise. She has a lovely pace, stops well (most of the time) and she's got plenty of confidence to push stubborn sheep. For this job though, I thought Maddie's lack of experience and her somewhat over-enthusiastic approach might be a problem. The same goes for Pippin, Mew and Jago. All are showing great potential, but lacking experience.

Much as my instinct was telling me Kay would be the safer choice, I felt I couldn't risk using her because although she has a fabulous outrun (just what was needed on this occasion) if things went even slightly wrong, I'd have no control over her at all. If Kay knows where you want the sheep to be, such as when she's working at home, she's unbeatable, but on new ground, she sometimes misunderstands what I want and I struggle to direct her.

Photo of Maddie lying in the grass looking very confident and pleased with life!
Maddie will be a natural first choice when she's a little more experienced

It also occurred to me that if Kay went chasing off into that wood and couldn't hear me, it could literally take hours to find her again!

My next choice would have been Jet, but she was heavily "in season" at the time and sometimes hormones can affect the work of female sheepdogs. If Jet's anything like her mother Kay (when Kay was younger) this could adversely affect her work.

These sheep needed a gentle, controlled touch. Carew would have been "in her element" with them, but she's not here.

Next choice was Odo, but it was risky because he'd only been back here for a few days, and he'd never worked in this field before, or with these particular sheep. What's more, I had only worked Odo for a very few minutes since he came back to us. It was a gamble, but I decided to go for it because Odo had been such a good worker before he left here.

It was a bad decision. Odo hadn't had time to re-settle with us.

Odo controlling sheep near some trees
Odo's sheep control is excellent.

When we reached the field, the sheep were in the worst possible place, right next to the brook at the bottom of the field. Odo has a pretty good outrun, so I guessed that would go reasonably well, but I wasn't sure I could stop him at that distance. If you can't stop the dog at the end of it's outrun, you should shorten the outrun to a suitable distance and if the dog stops well, gradually increase the distance. The closer you are to the dog, the more control you have over it - but that's when the dog's in training. This was farm work, and it was skilled farm work which Odo wasn't ready for. Although I could have walked down the field to get closer before I sent him off, the sheep were already looking uneasy. Our approach might provoke them to pop over the brook and into the wood.

Jet's a smooth coated prick-eared border collie sheepdog
With hindsight, I should have used Jet after all. I'm sure she'd have been fine!

I decided to trust Odo's outrun, and sure enough, he went out beautifully wide, but he was excited and clearly going too fast. Because the sheep were tight against the boundary, once he reached the brook on his outrun, he had to follow it. This meant he was coming straight at the sheep, and worse, I couldn't slow him down. He brought most of the sheep away from the brook and into the field well, but on occasions like this, most is not good enough. Two of the sheep dived over the brook and into the wood, and thick with undergrowth as it was, I couldn't get Odo to go in after them. Sadly, John and I made the decision to abandon the task and let the sheep settle for a few days.

I'll use Jet next time. She's got a good outrun, and I'm pretty certain she'd have gathered all of those sheep cleanly. I worked her the next day and her hormones weren't affecting her work at all. Poor Odo did his best but he was too excited. He went too fast, and too straight. He needs more work so that when he goes out it's not such a novelty.

Too much eye? There’s a tutorial for that!

Closeup photo of a black and white rough coated sheepdog staring intensely at something. This can be a sign that the dog has what's known as too much eye

Watch the "Sticky Dogs" tutorial to get your dog moving

Some years ago I kept my first training sheep in a small paddock behind a large country house. Sometimes the children of the house would come out to watch my efforts, and shout their approval from the sidelines. They also frequently dismantled my hurdle ring, despite my requests that they didn’t, to make a “tent town”. I confess I wasn’t always very welcoming.

Sheepdog and handler standing at the entrance to the trials field
Nice stick - be careful where you leave it.

However, one afternoon I pulled into the drive and the children gathered around me, looking very grave. Apparently they’d “been out to check the sheep for you” and found something sticky in the hedge.

I pulled on my wellies and tried to make sense of what I was being told. The oldest child, a boy, took charge of the situation, sensing that his sisters were failing to do justice to the discovery. “It IS sticky,” he stressed, making an extravagant gesture with his arms, “And it’s brown…and there’s a tooth on it!” he announced. What fresh Hell was this? I prepared myself for the vet’s bill.

It was my shepherd’s crook, left stuck in the hedge where I’d left it the previous evening. I had to admit it WAS sticky, inasmuch as it was like a stick, and it WAS brown, but it didn’t have a tooth - it was a horn.

So when anyone describes their dog as sticky having too much eye isn’t always the first thing that comes to mind. But that’s my problem.

When an inexperienced handler realises they have a dog with eye it’s usually having too much eye that’s the problem. The dog might have a stop to die for, but won’t get up again; or you try to send it to gather from a few yards - and it just stares, and won’t leave your legs. This is a sticky dog.

Eye has its place.

Carew at work with sheep

Eye is said to be a unique feature of collies, allowing them to move even stubborn livestock with a penetrating stare and an attitude. We have mixed feelings about eye. Whilst strong-eyed dogs, slinking about with their chins at ground level, look jaw-droppingly gorgeous, a dog that works with confidence, with its head high and showing no eye whatsoever, can be a stronger worker, even if it wouldn’t win any points for artistic merit.

A dog whose strong eye makes it difficult to move often gives the impression of being afraid, and sheep are quick to assess this.

Whatever the arguments one way or another, if you find yourself with a sticky dog you need to get it moving smoothly around the sheep before you can hope to make any progress. Happily, we have a tutorial to help you do just this. Watch “Sticky Dogs!”

Cover image for the Sticky Dogs tutorial

In “Sticky Dogs!” Andy works with a lovely little bitch, Mab. Mab was late to take an interest in sheep, and when she did she clearly showed a lot of eye and worked in the typical stop-start manner.

In our tutorial Andy shows that with an assertive, but kind and encouraging, approach Mab learned to work fluently. The emphasis is always on movement - and sometimes it’s the trainer who has to do the moving.

Once you’re making progress watch our “Backwards is the way forward” and “Back to forwards” tutorials for a simple exercise that reaps huge benefits for any young dog. The walking backwards exercise teaches balance, sheep control, working distance, reinforces the flanking and stop commands, and, vitally, keeps the dog moving.

We recommend that you watch a couple of times before you put the technique into practice, and then watch again after you’ve tried it with your own dog, when it will mean so much more.

So don’t worry, finding you have something sticky doesn’t have to be bad news.

  • ONLINE SHEEP AND CATTLE DOG TRAINING TUTORIALS
    Clear, inexpensive, herding sheepdog training instruction

    We now have 64 clearly explained, easy to follow sheep and cattle dog training videos for first time sheepdog trainers, farmers, and shepherds. Watch the preview here!

    Click icon at bottom-right of viewer for full-screen mode.

    For a very small monthly (or annual) subscription, watch many hours of expertly presented sheepdog training lessons. Not just theory - we show you what should happen, and what to do when things go wrong. Signup now You may cancel payments at any time and continue to watch for the period paid for.

Scary Place 2 (The Sequel)

Herding Sheepdog Kay shows her great courage as she calmly and confidently removes some sheep from a very dark confined space

Kay shows her daughter Jet how to get sheep out of a Spooky Black Hole!
Watch the VIDEO below!

There was quite a stong response on social media when we posted a picture of a rather nervous looking Jet outside a dark hovel which was full of sheep.

Jet was contemplating the task of going into the hovel to remove the sheep. It's not a pleasant task for a trainee herding dog because the dog knows it will be trapped inside the building and if the sheep attack it, there's no escape.

Usually, the trainee dog's response is to attack the sheep closest to the entrance. In the ensuing chaos, most of the sheep will usually come out of the building, but often, the task has to be repeated to remove the remaining animals. Obviously, this is not good practice. At the least, it stresses the sheep and makes any further handling or movement of them all the more difficult.

In this video, Jet's mother, Kay demonstrates just how the job should be done, by quietly and confidently going round between the sheep and the wall. The sheep come out quietly with the minimum of stress.

  • ONLINE SHEEP AND CATTLE DOG TRAINING TUTORIALS
    Clear, inexpensive, herding sheepdog training instruction

    We now have 64 clearly explained, easy to follow sheep and cattle dog training videos for first time sheepdog trainers, farmers, and shepherds. Watch the preview here!

    Click icon at bottom-right of viewer for full-screen mode.

    For a very small monthly (or annual) subscription, watch many hours of expertly presented sheepdog training lessons. Not just theory - we show you what should happen, and what to do when things go wrong. Signup now You may cancel payments at any time and continue to watch for the period paid for.

Is it wise to buy more than one puppy?

Two rough coated border collie puppies in the foreground facing the camera with another one sniffing around in the background

The short answer is "no - it's a bad idea".

From time to time, people ask if they can buy more than one puppy from us. It's very rare that we say yes.

When you buy a puppy or even a trained sheepdog, it's very important that the new dog 'bonds' with you as quickly as possible. All dogs are pack animals. That means they form a strong bond with the other members of the pack (whether they be dogs or humans).

Whether there are other dogs around or not, the dog should include its owner (and members of the owner's family) as respected pack members, and it's important that the dog sees its new owner as its pack leader.

A puppy lying on the concrete close to a brick pillar

Establishing yourself as pack leader doesn't mean you need to be cruel to the dog. Far from it. All you need to do is be Firm, Fair and Consistent. Teach the dog good manners. This makes training far easier than it will be if there's no bond

If you buy two puppies together, particularly pups from the same litter, they will already have a very strong bond between themselves and unless you know how to cope with this, their bond could be so strong that it will exclude you!

If you're buying a puppy, it's far better to get one, and establish a good bond with it. Then perhaps after about six months, get another puppy. You'll find that there's no problem with bonding, and in fact, the older dog will teach the younger one quite a lot about daily routine and how you like your dogs to behave.

Whether there are other dogs around or not, the dog should include its owner (and members of the owner's family) as other pack members, and it's important that the dog sees its new owner as its pack leader.

Kelpie Molly earns her wings!

Despite having little training to date, Molly's reached basic Sheepdog Status!

Sheepdog training sessions have been somewhat few and far between here recently, because we've been busy updating the sheepdog training tutorials as well as working on the website. So after a really good session with Scylla today, I thought it was high time Molly had a session.

Close up photo of Molly concentrating hard on her sheep
I was pleased to see that Molly was fully focussed on her sheep throughout today's training session

We were seriously impressed with Molly early in July, but in her next lesson, she seemed to have lost interest a little, so we gave her another break from working.

When I brought her out into the field today, the sheep were a good eighty metres away, but I didn't want to put any pressure on her at all, so rather than walk down the field to get closer and give Molly a better chance of success (as I normally would) I decided on this occasion to simply send her off, and see what happened.

At first, Molly seemed a little confused, as though she wasn't sure whether I wanted her to approach the sheep, or whether we were going to do something else, but making a “shushing” sound soon showed her what I wanted, and she went off towards the sheep on a lovely outrun, widening out as she approached them. She gathered the sheep together as though she'd been doing it all her life, before bringing them to me at a steady pace. I was astonished!

I gave Molly a good session consisting of flanking both ways, short outruns and bringing the sheep up behind me, and although she's clearly not what you'd call highly trained, I can honestly say that if our sheep had escaped into a neighbour's field and Molly was our only dog, I wouldn't hesitate to take her with me to help get the sheep back. This is my benchmark for a sheepdog, so as far as we're concerned, Molly qualifies as a basic sheepdog!

Clearly she needs a lot more training before she can be described as skilled, but when a dog is as easy to train as Molly, training's a real pleasure. I'm a little concerned about her lack of interest in her previous session of course, but if she enjoyed today's session as much as I did, she'll be fully focussed in future!

  • ONLINE SHEEP AND CATTLE DOG TRAINING TUTORIALS
    Clear, inexpensive, herding sheepdog training instruction

    We now have 64 clearly explained, easy to follow sheep and cattle dog training videos for first time sheepdog trainers, farmers, and shepherds. Watch the preview here!

    Click icon at bottom-right of viewer for full-screen mode.

    For a very small monthly (or annual) subscription, watch many hours of expertly presented sheepdog training lessons. Not just theory - we show you what should happen, and what to do when things go wrong. Signup now You may cancel payments at any time and continue to watch for the period paid for.

New Tutorial: Train a Sensitive, Reluctant Dog

Close up photo of Maisie, the dog used in this herding sheepdog training tutorial

The first training session for reluctant Maisie

Our online tutorials include Starting a Young Puppy, and Starting a Strong Dog. Now it's time to look at another common type of young dog - A Reluctant Dog - sensitive and apparently uninterested.

Maisie's parents (Isla and Ezra) could never be accused of lacking enthusiasm, so at the age of 9 months we were surprised to find how reluctant their daughter was to work sheep. Nonetheless, we were sure Maisie could make a useful working dog.

Maisie has possession of the frisbee while friends Ezra and Kelpie Molly wait in hope!

In this tutorial you'll see Maisie's first lesson with sheep. Initially we have to overcome her reluctance to work, and spark her interest (her "hunting" instinct). Once that's achieved, despite Maisie's sensitive nature, we have to protect the sheep while still boosting Maisie's confidence.

It might sound like a balancing act, but Maisie makes excellent progress in a short time. If you have a sensitive and reluctant dog you can take heart from this 10 minute tutorial.

If you don't have a sensitive dog, you'll still benefit from seeing how and when to limit the pressure applied by your control measures, while at the same time encouraging the dog to work.

In effect, Starting a Reluctant Dog can be viewed as a prequel to Calm, but Firm, which deals with a sensitive dog working in the open field. Calm, but Firm can be found on page 4 of the Confidence category list, or in the Distractions category; this is the type of dog who'll look for ways to avoid pressure.

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  • ONLINE SHEEP AND CATTLE DOG TRAINING TUTORIALS
    Clear, inexpensive, herding sheepdog training instruction

    We now have 64 clearly explained, easy to follow sheep and cattle dog training videos for first time sheepdog trainers, farmers, and shepherds. Watch the preview here!

    Click icon at bottom-right of viewer for full-screen mode.

    For a very small monthly (or annual) subscription, watch many hours of expertly presented sheepdog training lessons. Not just theory - we show you what should happen, and what to do when things go wrong. Signup now You may cancel payments at any time and continue to watch for the period paid for.

Wow! Kelpie Molly gets our ‘Man of the Match’ Award!

Close up photo of Molly lying on the grass

It's taken a while, but Molly's showing real commitment and keeping her sheep together very well

If you've read our Kelpie vs Collie blog, you'll know that we've had our ups and downs with Kelpies over the years, and I've personally been on the receiving end of some bitter comments from enthusiasts for what I wrote about Kelpies.

Herding sheepdog trainees, Mossie and Kelpie Red
Our collie pup Mossie (left) was exceptionally easy to train, whereas Red's progress was erratic,. He was immature.

That's a pity, because the people who directed their vitriol and untrue accusations in my direction clearly hadn't taken the trouble to read any further than the part where we returned our young Kelpie to his breeder. The blog went on to describe some really impressive Kelpies that later came here on training courses. (We no longer run sheepdog training courses).

Putting the criticism aside, I learned from these promising young dogs that Kelpies are perfectly trainable using just the same methods that we use for training collies. Our mistake was expecting them to mature as quickly as collies. We're aware that there's very little information on training Kelpie to work stock, so we eventually decided to include the training of Kelpies in our sheepdog training tutorials.

Close up photo of Will coming towards the camera
Will was aggressive with sheep when he began his training.

We duly announced that we were looking for a Kelpie puppy and quite soon we had one on order, but then our pup and all his litter mates were stolen from their breeder in Shropshire! This was very upsetting for both ourselves and of course the breeder. We quickly assumed we'd never see the pup we'd ordered and being keen to get started with our Kelpie training programme, we approached Red's breeder to see whether he had anything suitable. Sure enough, he sold us Will who was just over six months old.

At the same time, we heard about another Kelpie pup (this time a female) who would be ready in May, so we took the plunge and ordered that one. Now we'd have two Kelpies to work with in our tutorials!

Soon after we ordered this female puppy, we had a call from the breeder of the original puppy to say that thanks to a huge response on social media, the entire litter of stolen pups had been tracked down to an address in North Wales and they were now on their way home to Shropshire!

Well, of course we couldn't possibly say we no longer needed the pup, so the next day we went and collected Tucker. Now we had two Kelpies in the yard (well, Tucker lived in the front porch for a while) and our name on another puppy which would bring our Kelpie 'pack' to three!

Kelpie Molly duly arrived in May 2016. Read about her on this link.

Will got off to a bad start.
After he'd settled in for a while, we took Will to the sheep and we were disappointed to find that he was extremely aggressive with the sheep. His behaviour was very similar to Red's but much worse. He didn't like being corrected and if you did correct him, he seemed to take his revenge out on the sheep as soon afterwards as he could. This was quite disturbing but after all, it was his first session. Doubtless he'd improve after a while.

Will's progress was very slow. I regularly train collies at six months of age, but Will was immature. I should have been more patient. His sessions with sheep were occasional and brief, because they were such an unpleasant experience. It was difficult to stop him from attacking the sheep constantly. It took a long time before he became more manageable around sheep, but once he settled down, he began to make satisfactory progress and went to work on a sheep farm a few weeks ago.

We loved will as a dog, but I hadn't liked him when he was around sheep. He's one of the most difficult dogs I've trained but having said that, now that he's more trustworthy, I can see great potential in him as a sheep and cattle dog.

Close up photo of black and tan Kelpie Tucker
He's fast and very noisy, but Tucker's a pleasure to train

Tucker on the other hand, has been a pleasure to train. When he was a puppy, he somehow found a way to get into the sheep pen and liked nothing more than to hassle them all up to one end of it. Fortunately he made such a noise while he was doing it, we knew immediately what was happening and we were able to capture him and take him away quickly.

Because of Will's aggression with sheep, I was apprehensive about training Tucker, but although he made a lot of noise and worked very fast, he wasn't actually attacking the sheep at all. It was fairly easy to get him to go round them and soon he would stop, too.

Molly on the other hand, was extremely disappointing. She was reluctant to go near the sheep, and then she'd charge at them, scattering them in all directions, and if corrected, she't stop working at all until your attention was off her, and then she'd scatter the sheep again. At least she wasn't biting them though.

Just as with Will, Molly was immature. We gave her a handful of lessons and then decided to leave her for a few months. It paid off handsomely.

Kelpie Mollie looks behind her
Molly got off to a slow start but she's fully committed to working now!

For the first time in a couple of months I took Molly to the sheep yesterday, and although she was reluctant to approach them at first, she quickly began to work well. I was so impressed I called Gill and asked her to come and watch! Molly was fully focussed on her sheep. She flanked beautifully, her pace was steady and I could stop her, but she sheep knew she meant business, and they showed her a lot of respect.

Our only problem was getting her away from the sheep at the end of the session. She refused to come to me, and sprang out of the way if I tried to catch her, so I asked Gill to go and fetch Scylla, thinking that Scylla would hold the sheep tight into a corner while I concentrated on catching Molly. It worked out easier than that though. Once Scylla was near, I could see that Molly had relaxed. I crouched down and called Molly, and she came to me immediately!

Man of the Match Award
Since we began training sheepdogs, Gill and I have often referred to whichever dog shows the most improvement in a training session as "Man of the Match". It's only a bit of fun, but it's great to note which dogs are learning quickly. With one exception (who will remain nameless for the time being) yesterday's session was excellent. Molly, Mew, Jago and Maddie all performed very well, but the clear "Man of the Match" was Molly! It's great to give that (albeit imaginary) award to a Kelpie at last.

Now I can't wait to take Molly to sheep again! Watch this space, and look out for Kelpies in our training tutorials soon.

  • ONLINE SHEEP AND CATTLE DOG TRAINING TUTORIALS
    Clear, inexpensive, herding sheepdog training instruction

    We now have 64 clearly explained, easy to follow sheep and cattle dog training videos for first time sheepdog trainers, farmers, and shepherds. Watch the preview here!

    Click icon at bottom-right of viewer for full-screen mode.

    For a very small monthly (or annual) subscription, watch many hours of expertly presented sheepdog training lessons. Not just theory - we show you what should happen, and what to do when things go wrong. Signup now You may cancel payments at any time and continue to watch for the period paid for.